Critique of The BareFoot Executive: Helpful or Confusing

Jacob Kuta
2 min readFeb 12, 2021

At the beginning of chapter seventeen Carrie Wilkerson to “channel [your] passion into funding”. Although, she states her passion is adoption which would not fit her own criteria for passions. Adoption is not a market that money can be made from. It is rather a joy and service that you can get if you become financially stable. She focuses too much on personal experiences than relating them to the real world. These personal stories are typically beneficial but not when they cloud the application of it. She claims that it is worth the risk and be paid. In early chapters, she encourages the readers to have a steady income before chasing after entrepreneurship goals. It feels as though she is contradicting herself or at least adding to the confusion. She does not give enough credit to people’s perception of expertise. She claims that if you have already achieved it then people will listen to you. To a degree this is true but the question is how many clients are you losing because you are not certified. It is necessary to have confidence, but it can be detrimental to be arrogant. She suggests carrying around an idea notebook which is not a problem. Although, she jumps into a story of how she had an idea for one of her favorite authors. It is confusing. The ideas should be only for ourselves. Giving free advice goes against her own ideology of knowing your own worth. She knew the idea was brilliant so she could have done more with it than just email the author the idea. Her ideas and methods appear to be very helpful and potentially beneficial to the reader. Although, her personal stories do not seem to follow her own advice or at the very least confuses the reader. In order to flourish underneath her advice, it appears that we must neglect some of her own teachings.

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